Google Drive As A Digital Library

Google is becoming the most popular platform in education. Many of the school districts I’ve worked for or with are using Google Apps for Education. This gives every person in the district access to Google Drive, but it seems an under utilized resource.

Most people use Google Drive as a Microsoft Office replacement. They edit documents, spreadsheets and occasional share a file. But it can do so much more.

Every school has a library. The library should have a digital catalog through a shared Google folder. It can be organized by grade, topic, class, or however you want. This would give students and teachers the resources of the library in a searchable, always available system.

The folder could be populated with public domain books, audio files to use in projects, videos made by other students, or code snippets. Google Drive can handle just about any file type you can think of. And all these files would be curated by the librarian and staff. Ensuring it’s appropriateness for the student body.

Student could easily find sound effect to use in a video project. Administrators could share a daily video announcement. Teachers could upload cheat sheets and extra practice for lessons. All things that could be access by everyone in the school and used over and over again.

I haven’t seen this implemented in a school wide system, but would like to hear about it if you know of any. Leave a comment or find me on Twitter.

2 thoughts on “Google Drive As A Digital Library

  1. In one word, litigation. I too think about the usefulness of digital for libraries, students and learning…a lot. It seems so easy and almost common sense. And then there is this thing called Intellectual Property and another called Copyright. And then what happens when you can’t 100%, without a doubt, prevent violating either or both; litigation. See this article for fun times on similar thought process: https://www.edsurge.com/news/2017-06-22-major-textbook-publishers-sue-follett-over-counterfeit-sales
    There is an answer but it will take many conversations to get there. MANY.

    1. It’s definitely a tough sell legally. I think a good place to start would be building the library with public domain resources.

      I could see collecting public domain images, audio, and text and use that as a starting point for teachers and students. At least then you would have shared library that you know students and staff have the right to use those resources in a project.

      The collection wouldn’t be nearly as bigs since you’d have to exclude any copyrighted material. But it would be a good start.

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